Ins & Outs 1.11.12

IN P Street Pictures is now on O Street on the west side of town. After losing her lease on the P Street shop, owner Judy Schlosser opened next to Emi and Harry’s Georgetown Dinette. Schlosser is grateful for the community’s support and is a welcome addition to the block. Check out her new space: P Street Pictures on O, 3204 O St., N.W. 202 337 0066, PStreetPix@Gmail.com. Barre3, a yoga and dance fitness studio, opened last week at 1000 Wisconsin Ave, N.W., Suite G-100 (on the ground floor of Old Dodge Warehouse at the corner of Wisconsin Avenue and K Street; its front door is next door to Chadwick’s Restaurant). It offers classes seven days a week in two studios with a locker room and a shower, lounge with fireplace and a childcare area. 202 450 3905. Georgetown@Barre3.com. Pie Sisters of Georgetown has opened at 3423 M St., N.W. With ovens, coolers and counters ready for action, Allison, Cat and Erin Blakely will feed Georgetown’s ever-expanding palette for all things sweet, creamy and fruity—with a few savory options, to boot. Flavors include apple caramel crunch, pecan, key lime and banana, coconut and chocolate cream. The shop sells pies in three sizes: the four-dollar “cuppie,” and seven- and nine-inch pies ($14 - $16 and $35, respectively). But if you return the glass plate that the pie comes in, you receive $5 off your next purchase. There are chairs and tables in front of the shop with a coffee counter as well. Pie Sisters is next door to Dixie Liquors, one of the shops along Regency Row: 202 338 PIES (7437). PieSisters.com. OUT Barnes & Noble closed in M Street store Dec. 31. A favorite of residents, the large store at M and Thomas Jefferson Streets had lost its lease. Except for Philip Levy’s Bridge Street Books on Pennsylvania Avenue, the Latern Bryn Mawr Bookshop on P Street and Georgetown University’s book store, almost no book stores remain in Georgetown. There is speculation that Nike will take over the space. The Pinball Museum moved out of the Shops at Georgetown Park and has re-located in Baltimore.

U.S.-Afghan Women’s Council Lunch With Hillary Clinton and Laura Bush

Honorees, distinguished guests, journalists and friends crowded inside the Benjamin Franklin room at the State Department on March 21 to congratulate the members of the U.S.-Afghan Women’s Council on the 10th anniversary of supporting the women of Afghanistan. Founded in 2002 by President George W. Bush and Afghanistan President Hamid Karzai, the council connects both U.S. and Afghan governments with the private sector, academia and non-governmental organizations to identify needs and to develop and implement initiatives to support Afghan women and girls. The council is based at Georgetown University. “There is an Afghan proverb: A good year is determined by its spring. I think that is a worthy proverb to keep in mind, and indeed it is a call to action for us to be sure that the spring sets the pace for the kind of good year we hope to see in Afghanistan,” Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said. “Let there be no doubt that even as the U.S. role in Afghanistan changes during the next few years of transition, we will continue to stand with and work closely with Afghan women.” “Some may wonder if these efforts and partnerships truly make a difference,” said Zala Ahmad, a student from rural Afghanistan who now studies at Brandeis University in Massachusetts thanks to the council. “I can tell you firsthand that they do.” While toasting the council with red glasses of hibiscus tea, dining on endive salads and Atlantic cod, and treating tastebuds to the sweet dessert served, a passion fruit clafouti, guests listened to Clinton, former First Lady Laura Bush, John DeGioia, president of Georgetown University, Ambassador-at-Large for Global Women’s Issues Melanne Verveer and several other speakers from Afghanistan involved with the council share stories and the astronomical differences in percentages of Afghan females now attending schools and even holding prominent positions. “Girls make up about 40 percent of the nearly 8 million children going to school in Afghanistan today,” Foreign Minister of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan Zalmai Rassoul said. “In 2000, there were no girls at that time.” He also noted that 30 percent of school teachers and 15 percent of university teachers are women. Today, 24 percent of doctors and medical workers across Afghanistan are women. Even with these positive numbers, he said Afghan women continue to be innocent victims, but the council has helped give them their opportunity back. “God created a couple,” said Vartan Gregorian, president of Carnegie Corporation of New York. “He did not create men first, women second. He created a couple at the same time. So, there is no way half of the couple can be inferior to the other half of the couple.” After several rounds of applause credited to the amount of effort and success that has gone in to the council, both Clinton and Bush were presented awards for their dedication by Georgetown University. Clinton was given the Caring for Children Lifetime Achievement Award from the Center for Child and Human Development by DeGioia, who teased that Clinton has been fighting for the rights of women and children since she wrote her scholarly article in 1973 for the Harvard Educational Review. Bush received the Champion for Afghan Women Award from Verveer, who said Bush “led by example, mobilizing resources to ensure that Afghan women and girls gain skills, opportunities, and particularly the education that they were denied under the years of Taliban repression.” When the luncheon was finished, Verveer said the program was over but the journey to continue fighting for the rights of Afghan women is not. “We hope that we will all continue to work together,” she said.

Ins & Outs 4.4.12

M&T Bank, which has a branch on Thomas Jefferson Street, will be adding another Georgetown location at 1420 Wisconsin Avenue, N.W., where the clothing store, Commander Salamander, once sold its funky wares. Never mind: Crave, a sandwich and salad eatery on Potomac Street that opened a couple of weeks ago, was abruptly closed. A dispute between business partners led to the decision. Manager and co-owner Garrett Bauman, also of Annie Creamcheese vintage clothing, told the Georgetowner he hoped to find another location nearby. The men's clothier, Gant, is coming to Georgetown in August and moving into 3239 M Street. It could not be more different than its previous tenant, the free-wheeling, live-music bar, the Saloun. The 2,000-square-foot space will sell Gant, Gant Rugger and Gant by Michael Bastian, according to Women's Wear Daily. Georgetown just got more preppy, as if it needed more help, Gentlemen's Quarterly opined: "The whole collection is still grounded in the archival, American sportswear Bastin and co. have perfected in the past few seasons but amped up in the flair department, complete with special details like the floral lining on an insanely perfect M-65 jacket or the bold flecks of bright yellow and orange on a Donegal tweed blazer." As if . . . Ligne Roset and Natuzzi are setting up shop in Glover Park. The furniture retailers have jointly leased the storefront at 2209 Wisconsin Avenue, said property manager Cynthia Cumbo, who added, "The space should be ready in March." The space was vacant after Mobili furniture departed more than three years ago. The clothing store, Riccardi & Sports, have left the Shops at Georgetown Park along with so many others. It can now be found at the main Riccardi at 3213 M Street -- 202-625-6687. Mega and green, too: Swedish fashion giant Hennes and Mauritz -- which has its H&M store on M Street at Georgetown Park -- plans a separate luxury line for 2013. "We have many different projects in progress and already next year we will be launching a completely new store chain. Like COS, which today is very successful with good profitability, the new chain of stores will be independent and complement the other offerings from the group," CEO Karl-Johan Persson confirmed. On April 12, H&M will launch its Exclusive Glamour Conscious Collection, promoted by Amanda Seyfried and Michelle Williams and is made using sustainable materials including organic cotton, hemp and recycled polyester. Hair stylist Luigi Parasmo is set to open his first namesake salon with fellow stylist Javier Calvo in Georgetown. Luigi Parasmo Salon will be equipped with a staff of 14 hair, make-up and nail stylists and opens its doors to the public on Tuesday, April 10. It will be located on 1510 Wisconsin Avenue. The Chipotle-spinoff restaurant Shophouse Southeast Asian Kitchen plans to open in the old location of Furin's Bakery at 2805 M Street. The first Shophouse restaurant in Washington opened in Dupont Circle in September last year. Shophouse aims to serve fast Asian food with high quality. The Georgetown Shophouse will open "later this year," according to the company. Tony and Joe's Seafood Place at Washington Harbour and the Potomac will finally reopen its inside restaurant for business in early May with some changes in both interior and on the menu. Since the April 2011 flood only the outside patio and bar have been open, and a limited menu has served from an outdoor kitchen.

An Alternative Way To Stay Cool This Season

D.C. is fraught with pools on top of apartment buildings, D.C.-run community pools and the occasional roof deck restaurant, but no where is there a members-only pool social club. Until now. The Penthouse Pool Club on U St. opened last weekend with a large turnout despite less-than-stellar weather, drawing their 1,000 members to a 60-foot pool, private sun deck, resort cabanas, communal fire pits and a membership lounge offering full food and beverage service.       The planning for the pool club started almost three years ago with an idea by David von Storch, president of Urban Adventures Companies, the parent company of VIDA Fitness, which has five locations throughout the city. A resident of D.C. for 25 years, he said there was a niche that hadn’t previously been filled, largely in part because ten years ago, there wasn’t the same demand there is now. “It’s now a true urban center; it’s grown up a lot,” he said in a phone interview. He pointed to the neighborhood of Logan Circle, where he resides. “I can walk to the grocery store, to the gym, the hardware store and to 15 restaurants; that wasn’t possible ten years ago in virtually any neighborhood. People are looking to live in the city, it’s not just convenient for work, it actually fits with how they see themselves living.” The 12,000 square foot rooftop was previously just that, a rooftop with an unattractive air conditioning system. But in the three years of planning, they modified the space for the pool, and moved the A.C. system underneath it. With plans to stay open until late October, the pool is heated by the rejection energy put out by the FIDA fitness gym. The A.C. system already takes this heat out to put in cool air, so they’re simply re-routing where it goes, which in the end, von Storch says, will be a huge cost saver and an environmentally friendly decision. With a lounge and pool capacity of 299 and 25 staffers, members and guests will be able to see panoramic capital views. The membership roster to the Penthouse Pool Club is now filled, however Urban Adventures Companies has established a waiting list for those wishing to become future members. Membership to the pool club also includes full access to all five D.C.-area VIDA Fitness locations. Designed by Stoneking von Storch Architects of other clubs like the Soho House in New York City and Miami, he noted that the Poolhouse Club is unique in that it’ll not only have the fitness component downstairs, but Aura Spa on the first floor, due to open later this summer. With an exclusive and an above-18 membership, the club is sure to draw crowds as the weather gets warmer. “The fact that you have to be 18, be a member of VIDA, creates an environment where it will be more relaxing, whereas other pools there are lots of kids jumping around. This is an alternative to that on the weekends, and not have to go out of town.” [gallery ids="100715,120504,120497" nav="thumbs"]

Ins & OutsMay 2, 2012

**STACHOWSKI MARKET AND DELI OPENS AT 28TH & P** Stachowski Market and Deli has opened in the former Griffin Market space at 1425 28th Street (at the corner of P Street). Jamie Stachowski has been selling his sausages and other meats at nearby Rose Park and elsewhere. The shop is sparsely decorated for now but offers sandwiches, including Italian sausage, pastrami and kielbasa. Its cases displays various cuts of beef, duck and pork. Chairs, coffee and other sundries are on their way. It is open Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. **BETSEY JOHNSON DECLARES BANKRUPTCY; M STREET STORE LOOKS TO CLOSE** News reports and Facebook updates flashed: fashion designer Betsey Johnson?s chain of stores went bankrupt April 26. Most of the 63 freestanding boutiques will close. The fate of the M Street store is uncertain, according to a store employee, but it does not look good. ?Johnson won?t be losing her job ? but as many as 350 store workers will after the May 8 liquidation,? reported the New York Daily News. Women?s Wear Daily reported the designer will retain control of the Betsey Johnson clothing label. The flashy, pink and fun scene near the Old Stone House may soon close. Stop by this week to say good-bye. **TASTE OF GEORGETOWN MOVED TO JUNE 2** The popular Taste of Georgetown, usually held in October, will next set up its serving tables along Wisconsin Avenue on June 2, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Participants include many of the best and most liked So, be sure to tag the date in your calendar. Visit (http://GeorgetownDC.com)[www.GeorgetownDC.com] or (http://TasteofGeorgetown.com)[TasteofGeorgetown.com] for details. **NEW RESTAURANT COMING TO GLOVER PARK:** The empty space at 2317 Wisconsin Ave., N.W., which once held Margarita?s, is slated to become a District Noodles. The Vietnamese restaurant is owned by Jennifer Hoang and her fianc?, Marc Farmer. Next to the Tennis Zone store and Whole Foods, the eatery will serve sandwiches along with rice bowl dishes and should open in four or six months. **MOVED: MERIDIAN HEALTH & RELAXATION** moved from The Shops at Georgetown Park to Book Hill on 1673 Wisconsin Ave., N.W. **URBAN DADDY D.C. PICKS ALL GEORGETOWN SHOPS FOR DERBY DAYS** The hip, up-to-date website, Urban Daddy, listed shops for Derby Day clothes last week. All the shops it cited are in Georgetown: ?The Right Clothes for Derby Day . . . you might be headed to the Gold Cup. Or you might ensconce yourself at a downtown hotel bar to take in the Derby. Either way, horses will be involved. (Also: bourbon.) And you?ll want to look the part. No, not like a jockey. With this stuff.? The UD list: Rag & Bone at 3067 M St., N.W.; Vineyard Vines, 1225 Wisconsin Ave., N.W.; Jack Wills, 1097 Wisconsin Ave., N.W.; Lost Boys, 1033 31st St., N.W.; Brooks Brothers, 3077 M St., N.W.

Stylin’ with Brad at Brooks Brothers

Television personality and celebrity stylist Brad Goreski stopped by Brooks Brothers on M Street April 13 during his seven-city book tour, signing copies of “Born to Be Brad: My Life and Style, So Far.” Patient fans lined up to meet Goreski, get his new book and pose with him. Fashionable Brooks Brothers employees helped with the reception that included champagne, finger food and tunes from DJ Ben Chang.

Green D.C.

Our nation’s capital takes being green very seriously. We top the list of environmentally-friendly “firsts” time and again. The numbers don’t lie, D.C. stands above the competition in LEED certified commercial and institutional green buildings per capita. And any foodie will tell you, this town loves supporting local farms. Many embassies catch the eye with their beauty and grandeur, but only one prevents greenhouse gas emissions. The Embassy of Finland is the first LEED certified embassy in the U.S. Years of retrofitting the modernist building has produced energy-efficient lighting, plumbing and ventilation. Mirroring Finland’s environmental commitment, the embassy is a pioneer in eco-friendly business practices. During those all too familiar summer scorchers, Pleasant Pops comes to our rescue. Inspired by paletas, a traditional ice pop from Michoacan, Mexico, the ingredients challenge our taste buds and support local farming. The Pleasant Pops mission dictates strict recycling practices and composting organic waste. Look for their new shop in Logan Square this summer. Eco-friendliness comes as second nature to Nusta spa, the first and only LEED certified spa in the U.S. Their goal is to approach green from the inside out. Renewable and recyclable, Nusta’s interior meets the highest standards of sustainability. They thought of everything, down to the ink used in printed materials. Ever wonder where your seafood actually comes from? Not at Tackle Box, whose green philosophy supports local suppliers who are using habitat-friendly fishing gear. Their fluctuating menu combats over-fishing and poor practices that endanger our oceans. Tackle Box believes environmentalism means flexibility, education and community. Washington Nationals Park is the nation’s first major professional stadium to become LEED certified. Sustainable design elements include energy-saving light fixtures, drought-resistant plants and a green roof over concessions. What about those pesky peanut shells sprawling the ground? A special ground filtration is system designed to catch shells and other debris before reaching the storm-water system. D.C.’s latest initiative is to keep our schools green. On March 20, the Center for Green Schools at the U.S. Green Building Council released the Green Classroom Professional Certificate. The program educates pre-K–12 teachers, paraprofessionals, administrators and parents about environmentally healthy practices in schools and classrooms.

Natural Healing—Just what the Doctor Ordered

Natural medicine is nothing new to Dr. Snejana Sharkar. Growing up, her mother would cure her colds with ingredients in their kitchen. “Teaspoons of herbal honey, black pepper and red wine several times a day,” said Sharkar. “For coughs and congestion, she would make a warm compress for my chest with crushed poppy seeds.” After receiving several Masters Degrees and Board Certifications, Sharkar is now giving her patients the same care her mother gave to her. “I believe in conventional medicine, too, don’t get me wrong,” she said. “But it’s more beneficial to treat botanically first, using hydrotherapy and even healing with massages and acupuncture.” Dr. Sharkar spent seven years at a family practice in Washington, D.C. as an ANCC Board Certified Nurse Practitioner and then 12 years specializing in adult cardiology before opening her own practice in Georgetown in February 2011. She received her Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine (ND) from the University of Science, Art and Technology, Montserrat, British West Indies and London, United Kingdom, is Board Certified in Integrative Medicine and is a member of the American Association of Integrative Medicine. She is the only provider in the Washington, D.C. area who holds a certification with the Wilson’s Temperature Syndrome (WTS) Restorative Medicine. Her new private practice, Indigo Integrative Health Clinic, is focused on allowing the body to heal itself by discovering and treating or removing the cause of pain. IIHC is located at 1010 Wisconsin Avenue and is open Monday – Wednesday. Her patients receive her time and devotion at each appointment. She tells them to leave 60-90 minutes in their schedules for their initial visits in order to get the most out of what the clinic has to offer. Contact Indigo Integrative Health Clinic at 202-298-9131 or go online to schedule an appointment at www.IndigoHealthClinic.com.

Welcome duo, Georgetown’s Newest Boutique

Georgetown's newest addition of contemporary women's clothing, duo (with a little “D”), will celebrate its grand opening this Saturday, February 11. A sibling venture—as Georgetown is becoming known for, with the Cupcake Sisters and the Pie Sisters, among other family-owned and operated businesses in the area—duo is the work of sisters Kyle and Elizabeth Barber, who promise to bring affordable, contemporary fashion to the neighborhood. The newest boutique in town features upscale, designer apparel and one-of-a-kind hand-crafted accessories, catering to the trendy fashion sense of the District and offering a mix of established and up-and-coming designers, including Greylin, Ali Ro, Amanda Uprichard, Addison Story and more. “We also have Cynthia Steffe’s new line Cluny, that’s just been released through Neeman Marcus,” says Elizabeth. “That’s one of our favorites.” “Addison Story isn’t around as much either, but I love it,” adds Kyle. “It’s kind of whimsical, with flowy tops and mixes of silk and fun patterns. Stuff that be worn to work, but also out to happy hour.” Duo is looking to be a wonderful addition to Georgetown’s retail district, appealing to young professionals, who want to wear designer clothes without having to pay typical designer prices. The store’s price points are generally between $150 and $250, but there are plenty of items around $50. The shop will also carry Kyle’s custom designed, handmade jewelry. “I started making jewelry years ago for family and friends, and people loved it,” Kyle says. “And I was tired of looking around and seeing people wearing the same stuff, that was also way more expensive than I thought it was worth. My jewelry definitely has a bohemian edge—it’s a combination of designs and materials. I love to find vintage earrings and incorporate them into more modern materials. To me—and everyone else has been very excited about it, too—it’s affordable and totally unique. You’ll never see anyone else wearing it.” One line of Kyle’s jewelry will be putting a portion of all proceeds toward charity. Kyle and Elizabeth have been working toward duo for a while now. Kyle has her Masters in education and has always been rather crafty. The store is something the sisters have always wanted to do. “And now seemed like a good time to join our interests together,” says Elizabeth. Join duo on Saturday for champagne, mimosas and hor d’oeuvres all day, from 10am to 7pm, and welcome them to the neighborhood. Duo is located at 1624 Wisconsin Ave., just next door to Urban Chic. For more information visit duoDC.com

Ins and Outs 2.22.12

Bidding Goodbye to Antiques of Georgetown A farewell party for Antiques of Georgetown is planned for March at the store, after it officially closes Feb. 29.  "I have been very happy here," said William Donahue, whose first antiques shop was four doors east on O Street. "I have loved being my own boss." As reported in the Jan. 25 Georgetowner, Donahue—who has operated an antique shop in Georgetown since 1967—is retiring. An economics major, Donohue worked for Riggs Bank downtown until the antiques world became a business for him. "My wife Mary and I had three kids when I started," Donahue said. "We lived in Foxhall Village." Now, they have places in Bethesda and Georgetown, and wife Mary prefers to spend more time in Florida. "One of my best clients was Supreme Court Chief Justice Warren Burger," said Donahue, who also recalled when First Lady Nancy Reagan visited his shop and was given two pieces of art she had admired—by the artist. The most interesting piece he sold? A desk with nine secret compartments. His most sentimental item? A chandelier from his family's R Street home, still in the shop. The Donahue family—the father was a physician—grew up on 35th Street. The children were born in Georgetown University Hospital; that same building is now Loyola dormitory. A brother, Matt, who lived on Prospect Street, died Jan. 19. Donahue remembers delivering newspapers in town when many black families lived on 32nd Street and elsewhere. Grown-up memories include Sunday brunches at Doc Dalinsky's pharmacy with trays of food from the Georgetown Inn's Collins Bird. One of those Sunday regulars, Ben Bradlee, might add: It has been a good life—antiquing and other adventures—for Donahue. The store is having a half-price sale; check www.Georgetowner.com for details on the March send-off reception. Say Hello to a 2nd Tu-O-Tu On Feb. 20, owner Mino Sarano opened a second eatery, Cafe Tu-O-Tu Express, at 3421 M Street, N.W., right next to the Pie Sisters. The Regency Row spot on the west side of town complements his first Tu-O-Tu near the Fours Season Hotel at the east side. Manager Bora Akcakanat welcomes his new neighbors with wraps, sandwiches, salads and an all-day breakfast, which includes a "Key Bridge" egg, cheese and bacon sandwich. So, that's area code 202 . . . 337 4455. New in Town: Suitsupply and Noodles and Company The Dutch outfit, Suitsupply, known for its quality suits at reasonable prices, will be opening its doors at 2800 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W., at the Four Seasons. The only other U.S. location is in New York. Noodles and Company is taking over the former Einstein's Bagels location by the Safeway building at 1855 Wisconsin Avenue, N.W. Dine in or take out a wide array of menu options, all containing noodles, of course.