...

La Dolce Vita

Photography by Angie Myers models Brett McAnney & Gabriella Bianchi at T?H?E Artist Agency Hair & Makeup by Lori Pressman at T?H?E Artist Agency Wardrobe by Chaza Betenjane at T?H?E Artist Agency Production Assistants Haley Sanchez & Lexi Rodencal Location Via Umbria, Georgetown This issue of The Georgetowner celebrates the Italian lifestyle: La Dolce Vita. Perchè adesso (why now)? No special reason needed; Italy looms large in American lives. The history, cultures and fates of our two countries are intertwined, both in hugely important ways and in matters that we take for granted, things that have taken up permanent residence in our hearts, minds and habits. What would opera be without the giant presence of the Italian composers, whose works warm the genre with boisterous energy and passion? What would cineastes do if they weren’t able to argue about Fellini and Antonioni? And where would American dining be without pizza and pasta and — since we’ve become more sophisticated — risotto, agnolotti and crudo (a term, if not a dish, said to have been invented by restaurateur Joe Bastianich)? American history begins in the 17th century; in Italy, they start before Anno Domini and run through Rome — the Republic, the Empire and the center of the Roman Catholic Church — and the Renaissance, the Baroque and all those periods from art history. Columbus was in the employ of Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain, but he was a citizen of Genoa, and it was a Florentine fellow named Amerigo for whom the New World was named. Centuries later, waves of Italian immigrants brought their innumerable talents, contributing to America’s progress through their own striving. Italians have tread a remarkable path here, becoming Americans without giving up the essential nature of who they are and who their ancestors were. They replicate their communal gatherings and remind us of the presence of the church in their history and lives. And every such occasion is replete with tradition and with the celebration of the familial ties that bind. Here in D.C., Holy Rosary Church, the “national Italian parish,” was established in 1913. Statues of Dante, Michelangelo, Verdi and Marconi adorn the façade of its Casa Italiana, where language classes and cultural programs are held. On April 3, Holy Rosary will host a Festa della Vendemmia wine tasting and a mass in honor of Maria SS. Annunziata, organized by the Society of Fiumendinisi of Messina, Sicily. To stay connected all year round to Italian events (and perhaps learn the language), visit the websites of the Casa Italiana at casaitalianaschool.org, the Istituto Italiana di Cultura at iicwashington.esteri.it/IIC_Washington/it and the Italian Cultural Society of Washington, D.C., at italianculturalsociety.org. [gallery ids="117125,117145,117139,117133" nav="thumbs"]

Dress for the Occasion

This issue’s arts preview focuses on opera, ballet and other upcoming performance and visual arts. Following these fashion suggestions will assure that some eyes will stray from the stage to members of the audience. photography by Angie Myers model: Belle Shickle at the Artist Agency hair and makeup: Lori Pressman at the Artist Agency wardrobe: Chaza Betenjane at the Artist Agency location and props: Washington Opera Rehearsal Studio [gallery ids="102258,128820,128824,128814" nav="thumbs"]

How to Dress Like You Are Sitting in the Front Row at New...

New York Fashion Week is right around the corner, and what you wear to the show can be almost as important as the shows themselves. Here are a few ideas about how to look fashionable, while still staying warm running from shows to show. A navy long-sleeve dress with sexy blue suede tassel bootie or red cap-sleeve sheath dress with killer t-strap black pumps will ensure paparazzi attention. For walking from venue to venue, a black swing ankle-length cashmere coat, fur slouch hat and very long red wool gloves will keep you cozy and fashionable. Fingerless black cashmere gloves let you text and take pictures of street style. Now, all we have to wait for are the invitations to come flowing in. [gallery ids="102378,123760,123753,123765,123777,123782,123772,123792,123787" nav="thumbs"]

Star Shops of Georgetown

The holiday season arrived in Georgetown right on time this year, manifested in festive lamppost adornments, shop-window displays filled with snowflakes and cheer and the unmistakable bite in the air from Old Man Winter himself. My boots hit the cobblestone sidewalk with a peppy clickity-clack as I stepped outside the Dolcezza on Wisconsin Avenue on a recent Saturday afternoon, fueled by an aromatic cup of joe. My mission? Complete the remainder of my holiday shopping list in one hour. Good thing I’m pretty well versed in this shopping-in-Georgetown thing. First stop? The new Georgetown Olive Oil Company store, to pick up something for my boyfriend’s parents. I first popped into the shop a couple weeks ago after work. I had just picked up a French baguette from the Foggy Bottom Trader Joe’s and was looking forward to finding something yummy to complement it. Upon entering, I was blown away by the vast variety of olive oils that not only exist, but are available in this beautiful shop. The owner, Emil, spent time educating me on the varied health benefits that oils from different regions of the world offer. I sampled a dozen different flavor varieties (a fraction of the 165 in the store). If this sounds like olive oil overkill, do yourself a favor and go see for yourself why it’s not. After doing a side-by-side taste test of any oil in the store versus a moderately priced bottle you might pick up in Safeway (Emil keeps a supermarket bottle on hand for this purpose), you will become a believer. The three-bottle packs that Georgetown Olive Oil Company is currently offering in hemp gift bags of festive hues make the perfect holiday gift, as a stand-alone or paired with complimentary sea salts, jams and chocolates. Gift Number One, checked off my list. My trek continued all the way down Wisconsin Avenue to the corner of K Street. Barre3, the studio offering classes designed to balance, strengthen and lengthen the body with moves inspired by ballet, yoga and Pilates, is here. The gorgeous space, defined by hardwood and exposed brick, exudes warmth and a sense of community. Studio owner Jill Warren first invited me to try a class more than two years ago. The Georgetown studio has been a spot for me to rebalance, reboot and embrace mental and physical well-being ever since. I’ve been dying to get my stepmom to give it a try, so what better time to purchase a set of classes for gifting? Gift Number Two — check. With gifts for my three sisters in mind, I head back up to M Street to the beauty-product store Lush. Lush’s whole philosophy centers around creating products for the hair and skin using fresh, natural ingredients. I stumbled upon the brand a few years ago when I was looking for an effective hair mask that wouldn’t break the bank. Naturally, I consulted with a college sorority sister (who has the healthiest, shiniest locks I’ve ever seen). She recommended Lush’s “Jasmine & Henna Fluff Eaze” mask. One try and I became a devoted convert. In addition to their top-notch hair masks, the shop is chock-full of natural soaps, lip glosses and face masks. This time of year, it is overflowing with an array of perfectly edited holiday gift sets. A basketful of products later, this gift-shop stop is complete. As I head back up Wisconsin toward home, I make a final stop at fine-stationary store Just Paper & Tea on P Street. The assortment of beautifully crafted cards within make this an effortless one-stop-shop for all of the holiday card recipients on my list. Owners Nick and Carolyn are the embodiment of warm and affable; I feel cheerier and more filled with holiday spirit just for having stopped by. As I stroll homeward amid groups of bustling holiday shoppers, I look to my left and pause, suddenly seized by the idyllic scene before me. Candlelit tables, crowded by families, friends and lovers, are visible through the windowpanes of tiny Café Bonaparte, creating a postcard-like display. I am struck for a moment by the beauty of the season in Georgetown. The gifts I’ve purchased for loved ones were chosen with care, yet the spirit of the season expressed in smiles exchanged is truly the greatest gift of all. [gallery ids="102171,132388,132399,132405,132381,132353,132374,132360,132368,132392" nav="thumbs"]

Red Speaks

’Tis the season to decide to be naughty or nice. What looks are in for 2016 holiday makeup? Bold lips or light gloss? The holiday season is the best time to play, so here is your guide — whether naughty, nice or somewhere in between. Red lips are, of course, a classic and instant way to party up your mood for the holidays. There are several ways you can enjoy this look. 1. Bold red lips speak for themselves. This season, leave the matching colored lip liner in your makeup bag. Applying red lip color without lip liner gives you a more modern and fresh feel. Using a lip color pencil is the ultimate easy way to create “unlined” lips — it doubles as the liner and the lip color, providing foolproof easy application (and easy to touch up when out and about). 2. Stained lips (applying lip color to your finger and then dabbing it onto your lips) is a subtle way to enjoy bold colors on your lips. Apply your choice of lip color on the inside of your natural lip lines and then clean up with cotton buds along the rim of your natural lip line. You can also use your finger to smudge and soften the color. 3. New to the red or still scared of the red color? Fear not! Tinted gloss is an effortless way to dazzle with your lips. It requires less touch-up and less precise application. Whichever choice you make with your red lips, make it joyful and have fun under the mistletoe! By Soo Park | Photography by Angie Myers Models: Flavia Dias, Enna Sliwinski, and Elle Einwaechter of THE Artist Agency [gallery ids="102192,131581,131590,131585" nav="thumbs"]

Legends of the Fall

Our “Legends of the Fall” shoot shows the much-discussed bearded lumbersexual in his natural habitat: the great outdoors. The outfits are at once stylish, utilitarian and cozy, mixing thick-knit sweaters and wool outerwear with scarves, lambswool, leather and lots of layers. The look works in the woods of Vienna where our models Andrei Talasman and Andrew Dolan Miller (and trusty dog, Thaidy) were shot ­— or on the town for a night out in Georgetown or along the bustling, trendy 14th Street corridor downtown. Enjoy, Legends of the Fall. Photography by Angie Myers Models Andrei Talasman and Andrew Dolan Miller T H E Artist Agency Styling Pamela burns Grooming Jessica Ariane T H E Artist Agency [gallery ids="102331,125805,125782,125789,125811,125795,125800" nav="thumbs"]

IIDA’s Cosmo Couture Salutes the Smithsonian With a Runway Show

The Smithsonian Institution and its museums were the star of the sith annual Cosmo Couture event, produced by Washington Metro City Center (WMCC) of the International Interior Design Association Mid-Atlantic Chapter Sept. 24 at the Howard Theatre with a center-piece runway show. This year, Cosmo Couture paid tribute to the Smithsonian Institution, the country’s largest museum complex, which shapes the future by preserving heritage, discovering new knowledge and sharing rich history with the world. Twenty five design teams participated in the event, which kicked off with a 2014 kick-off party, held in June. The teams randomly selected a museum from the Smithsonian collection, getting four months to work on their creations. Some of the selected 13 museums providing inspiration included the American Indian Museum, Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, the Air & Space Museum, the National History Museum, and the African Art Museum. Judges included Michael McCarthy, editor of D.C. Magazine, Emily Gonzaga, owner and creative director of D’Milikah-Brazilian Fashion House, Adam Woitkowski, vice president and general manager at Saks Fifth Avenue in Tysons Corner, Star Glam Pezeshkian, editorial studies, and Christopher Schafer, menswear designer for Christopher Schafer Clothier. The 25th Cosmo Couture beneficiary was Rebuilding Together of Washington, D.C., which preserves and revitalizes low-income home and community facilities in the District of Columbia. [gallery ids="102317,126351,126357,126364,126344" nav="thumbs"]

Get Schooled on Fall Styles

This fall calls for rich Bordeaux and leather fringe. Maroon, reds and navy are making a bold burst onto the fall fashion color watch. Bordeaux, or wine, is a dark red tone that has both purple and burgundy shades. For years, Burgundies and reds tend to trend during the fall season, but Bordeaux is slightly darker — making it a great shade for accessories, fashion and beauty. Bordeaux is versatile and can revamp your brown, black, navy and khaki palletes. Pair with a chunky heel and hints of gold, and you will claim this fall trend as yours. Photography by ANGIE MYERS Model Kyler Garner from T H E Artist Agency Styling Pamela Burns of PAMShops4You Makeup Landre with Behind the Veil, LLC Location GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY Look 1: Model wears: Black Leather Jacket by Vince, $995 at Neiman Marcus Chevy Chase; Merlot Sweater by Alice & Olivia, $195 at Bloomingdales Chevy Chase; Feather Shirt by Alice & Olivia, $495 at Neiman Marcus Chevy Chase; Gold Necklace by Agua, $28 at Bloomingdales Chevy Chase; Red and Gold Bracelet by Agua, $25 at Bloomingdales Chevy Chase; Wine Handbag by Michael Kors, $298 at Michael Kors Tysons; Shoes (model’s) Look 2: Cream Sweater by Joie, $228 at Neiman Marcus Chevy Chase; Olive Crop Jeans by 7 for Mankind, $198 at Neiman Marcus Chevy Chase; Fur Vest by Joie; $798 at Neiman Marcus Chevy Chase; Sneakers by Surperga, $169 at Bloomingdales Chevy Chase; White Earrings by Kenneth Jay Lane, $68 at Intermix D.C.; Gold Cuff; $120 at Nordstrom Tysons; Backpack by Marc Jacobs $198 at Norstrom Tysons. Look 3: Navy and Red Plaid Top by SEA Exclusive, $295 at Intermix D.C.; Red Sweater by A.L.C. Hansen, $295 at Intermix D.C.; Jeans by Jbrand, $198 at Bloomingdales Chevy Chase; Tan Fringe Handbag by Rebecca Mincoff, $195 at Bloomingdales $195; Gold Cuff, $120 at Nordstrom Tysons; Earrings and Shoes (model’s) Look 4 & 5: Multi-Color Sweater Vest by Alice & Olivia, $695 at Neiman Marcus Chevy Chase; Sleeveless Plum Turtleneck Sweater by Elizabeth & James, $195 at Bloomingdales Chevy Chase; Jeans by JBrand, $238 at Neiman Marcus Chevy Chase; Black Booties by Vince, $495 at Bloomingdales Chevy Chase; Earrings by Diane von Furstenberg, $128 at Bloomingdales Chevy Chase; Bracelet by Tory Burch, $165 at Nordstrom Tysons; Black Backpack by Tory Burch, $550 at Bloomingdales Chevy Chase. [gallery ids="102284,127745,127740,127728,127735" nav="thumbs"]

Urban Chic to Close for Good by the End of the Month

Clothier Urban Chic will close its Georgetown store for good at the end of this month. Owner Lindsay Buscher announced Thursday that the shop, known for carrying clothes by high-end designers like Diane Von Furstenburg and Trina Turk, is closing and attributed its failure to the rise of cheaper clothing outlets (namely, H&M and T.J. Maxx), and upstarts like Rent the Runway in Georgetown. Buscher attempted to revive the flailing store in March with a relaunch focused on drawing in younger customers. The bid failed but Buscher told the Washingtonian, "“I love Georgetown, and I love and will miss all of our loyal customers that have stood by our side for the last decade." The store is holding a closing sale, starting today, with prices starting at 35 percent off. Urban Chic paid rent for the month of July but a store representative says she doubts that the merchandise will last until the end of the month. Urban Chic is located at 1626 Wisconsin Ave. NW.

‘Seven’ Fashion Show at Artisphere

Fashion enthusiasts took a creative journey through the Seven Deadly Sins with "Seven," a fashion show, on Wednesday, June 3. Guests experienced looks that represent greed, lust, gluttony, sloth, wrath, pride and envy, in a show that was styled and produced by fashion students at the Art Institute of Washington. The show was held at the Artisphere in Arlington. The merchandise and talent for the show was pulled from local Washington area designers, small businesses and students at the Art Institute of Washington.