Historic DC Weddings

Imagine your wedding day as national headline news, read from DC to Des Moines. You, your groom and your guest list are the subject of Washington’s biggest event of the year, and anyone who’s anyone is going to be there. Marjorie Merriweather Post became accustomed to this tradition, as the bride in four of her own weddings, and the unofficial wedding planner for each of her three daughters. As the daughter of Charles William Postum, the founder of Postum Cereal Company (now Post and General Mills cereal) Mrs. Post was a distinguished socialite, with an eye for putting on spectacular events. A regular host of Washington socialite dinner parties, Mrs. Post had a remarkable list of contacts, including Washington’s elite. Pulling from these contacts, Mrs. Post created the guest lists for each of the weddings she planned. These traditional white weddings stood apart from the rest because both the bride and her guests were all Washington socialites, and the events they attended were guaranteed to be grand. Both as a bride and a planner, Marjorie Post had an extraordinary ability to envision an event from start to finish, scrupulously putting every last detail in place. In her second wedding to E.F. Hutton, Mrs. Post coordinated everything from her dress and flowers down to the color of the icing on the cake. Very interested in fashion, Mrs. Post’s wedding dresses reflected the most prominent styles of the time. The first dress she wore to her 1905 wedding to Edward Close was very traditional, featuring a high collar and more fitted bodice. This changed drastically by her 1935 wedding to Joseph E. Davies, when she wore a dress of true Hollywood glam made of velvet with a seven-foot train. By her fourth wedding in 1958, she chose to embrace the popularity of the shorter gown, despite being nearly 70 years old. Besides having an incredible eye for design, it was the way in which Mrs. Post carried out these events that made them a cut above the rest. By sending out reminders before the event occurred and thank-you notes in appreciation of all those attended, Marjorie Post had perfected the role of a socialite in gaining the respect of all who knew her. Although Mrs. Post’s gatherings had a reputation for extravagance, and her guest list filled with Washington’s most powerful names, many of the traditions were no different than weddings of today. As a bride herself, Marjorie Post certainly had her bridal opinion, picking the color, style, fabric and design of her bridesmaids’ dresses. As the mother of three young brides, Mrs. Post had a strong hand in navigating their weddings as well, using her contacts to secure an amazing event. Just as today, historic Washington socialite weddings were a monumental moment in the bride’s life, the planning as much of an event as the wedding itself. In observing the traditional ways weddings have been done in the past we can all gain a greater appreciation for the traditions we still carry out today. For more information on Marjorie Merriweather Post visit the Hillwood Museum’s upcoming exhibit featuring all four of Mrs. Post’s wedding dresses and many other wedding artifacts. [gallery ids="99594,105020,105009,105016,105013" nav="thumbs"]

Haute & Cool: Say It With Style!

There may not be much good news these days, but Dr. Deborah Birx's enduring poise and fashion flair certainly make the White House briefings more inspiring.

Breathe Easier With DIY Masks

Now that the CDC is advising us, symptomatic or not, to wear masks when we go outside, they are, of course, nowhere to be found.

Star Shops of Georgetown: Mashburn Retail Therapy

Fashion is the Mashburn family business, and it just keeps growing, as evidenced by the brand’s new store in Georgetown. Husband-and-wife team Sid and Ann are behind the operation, and they bring every bit of their background — his in retail, hers in writing for fashion publications — to the new digs at Georgetown Court, with entrances on N Street and Prospect Street, and to their other stores in Atlanta, Houston and Dallas.

Walking the Red Carpet at the American Portrait Gala (photos)

Guests were treated to a private viewing of the honorees’ portraits, which will remain on view in the museum’s “Recent Acquisitions” exhibition through Aug. 30, 2020.

Redskins and Fashion Go Together: NFL Fan Style Tour Comes to Town

The hometown team may be up or down, but fans always want to have a winning style. So, the NFL Fan Style Tour is pulling into town -- just in time for the Washington Redskins -- after traveling to different stadiums throughout the 2014 season. The Washington Redskins will host two NFL Fan Style Tour stops, Dec. 19 and Dec. 20. The first is at Tysons Corner Center and the second before the Saturday game between the Washington Redskins and Philadelphia Eagles at FedEx Field in Landover, Md. On Friday, Dec. 19, there will be a VIP Teens Apparel Event where fans will have the chance to meet Tanya Snyder, wife of Washington Redskins owner Daniel Snyder, and be styled by her daughters, Tiffanie and Brittanie Snyder. It is at the Washington Redskins Team Store, 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m., at Tysons Corner Center, McLean, Va. For the second NFL Fan Style Tour stop, fans can join the Snyders at FedExField Hall of Fame Store (located between Gates A & H), Saturday, Dec. 20, 12:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m, and experience the NFL Fan Style Tour’s 2,000-square-foot truck, where they can check out this year’s top fashion pieces from NFL Men’s, Women’s and Tweens/Junior’s apparel, as well as NFL Homegating products. The truck will also include authentic NFL Auction items, a Virtual Dressing Room, a Photo Mosaic, NFL Trivia and EA Madden Gaming Stations, giveaways, special appearances and more. The NFL Fan Style Tour experience is free and open to all fans.

Upscale Resale: Georgetown’s Boutiques

With crisp temperatures and the holidays quickly approaching, nothing is quite as refreshing as updating your fall and winter wardrobe. And while it sounds festive, a closet makeover may not bring much cheer when shopping for high-end items on a budget. However, five second-hand stores and consignment shops here in Georgetown are keeping resale upscale, trendy and, most importantly, affordable. Ready to update your fall wardrobe? Let’s get shopping. Buffalo Exchange is a national chain that opened its store at M & Potomac a year ago. The store has both women’s and men’s clothing and shoes as well as women’s accessories. The store is not consignment, but resale where trades are made over the counter and sellers paid on the spot. Those selling items can either receive 50 percent of the sale price for store credit, or be paid 30 percent in cash. Store credit never expires and can be used at any Buffalo Exchange. The Georgetown store’s associate manager Sade Persad says the store buys in items based on what is current and trendy. “From Target to Saks, we don’t look for certain brands.” Persad said. “If it’s something that we feel reflects our customers, we buy it in.” The personal aspect is appealing to Persad, who said the store interacts with customers to cater to what they are shopping for. Inventory reflects local shoppers, making every Buffalo Exchange store different. Persad advised to check out the store frequently as inventory is constantly changing and items can sell within five minutes of being on the floor. Buffalo Exchange works with local charities and also holds a number of promotional events. Buffalo Exchange is located at 3279 M St., NW. Open 11 a.m. to 8 p.m., Monday through Saturday; noon to 7 p.m., Sunday. Krista Johnson opened Ella-Rue, a high-end consignment shop, in November 2010. The boutique is named after Krista’s two rescue dogs: Ella, a Pit Bull, and Rue, a Jack Russell terrier. The store is light and bright, and clothes line both walls with two small curtain-drawn dressing rooms at the back. “I designed the store to emulate your super fabulous, hardworking and maybe famous friend’s closet,” Johnson said. Opening a store had been a dream of Johnson’s since she was a little girl. When the economy went sour, she decided to open a high-end consignment store. Both Johnson and store manager Lolly Amons are local, yet their consigners span beyond Georgetown. “We have clients all over the country so our store has closets from Los Angeles, New York, Paris, Hawaii, Palm Beach and South Hampton,” Johnson said. Ella-Rue carries new with tag items from top designers like Shoshanna, Louis Vuitton, Gucci and Chanel. Most of the women’s clothing and accessories in the store have an East Coast vibe, according to Amons, and consignors get a 50-50 split of the final sale price. Ella-Rue holds fundraisers for charities and often supports animal rescues. It will host a third-anniversary party in early November. Ella-Rue is at 3231 P St., NW, and is open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday; noon to 5 p.m., Sunday. The newest consignment shop on the block is Reddz Trading, which opened in June. Owner Wendy “Red” Ezrailson opened her first trading store three years ago in Bethesda, Md. But Ezrailson’s retail experience didn’t start there. She and her husband owned Commander Salamander and Up Against the Wall in Georgetown for 40 years, before taking on consignment. Back in her “old stomping ground,” Ezrailson said her vision for Reddz was to make it look like a boutique. “I wanted to make it look really nice inside so people shop in a good atmosphere,” she said. The store boasts bright red doors with accents of red décor on the inside. Reddz merchandise includes brands from J. Crew through high-end designers. Ezrailson said the store is diverse— you could be looking for anything from a Chanel suit for $800 to a J. Crew top for $18. “I like that we have a nice variety in the store—letting everyone in— not feeling rejected in anyway,” she said. The store carries women’s clothing and accessories and men’s clothing, however Ezrailson said she’s waiting for men to bring in items. Shopping at Reddz is all about looking for the treasure, according to Ezrailson. Sellers receive 30 percent for the item or 45 percent in the form of a trade card to use in the store. “You will have a great experience selling your clothes with us,” she said. Trading at Reddz happens at 1413 Wisconsin Ave. NW. Open 10:30 a.m. to 7 p.m., Monday through Saturday; noon to 6 p.m., Sunday. Back on M Street is another consignment chain, whose flagship store started just outside of Boston 40 years ago. Second Time Around has seen a lot of foot traffic in Georgetown, according to the store manager Lauren Broccoli. Broccoli said college students are catching on to the idea of resale. “Clients are telling their friends and it’s a great way to replenish your wardrobe,” she said. Second Time Around carries women’s clothing, shoes and bags at their Georgetown location. Broccoli said the store is special because people are “on the hunt” for something unique but always walk out surprised. The shop stands out because it has a little of everything, catering to an age demographic of 17 to 75, according to Broccoli. Consignment payment with the store is monthly and consignors receive 40 percent of the final sale. Consigning a high-end designer handbag will get you 50 percent of the sale. Clients can keep the sale as in-store credit for wardrobe recycling. Second Time Around is at 3289 M St., NW, and open 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Monday through Friday; 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Saturday; noon to 6 p.m., Sunday. The last stop of chic consignment in Georgetown is Tari. The boutique feel of Tari causes many customers to walk in unknowing it’s consignment. “We try to find our balance within it,” Alida said. “Overall it’s a positive and people enjoy the shopping experience.” Tari takes in moderate brands to high-end designers and vintage pieces. “Always expect to find some little treasure here,” Alida said. The store is affiliated with D.C. Fashion Foundation and supports local designers by featuring their pieces every season. Tari has both women’s and men’s clothing as well as women’s accessories. Owner Sara Mokhtari builds relationships with clients through the store’s unique consignment process. Consignors have a 50-50 split. Items in the store are marked at 65-75 percent off retail and new items with tags are marked at 50 percent. Consignors get a 60-40 split if they make the sale for store credit. “It’s always great to take a peek in because you never know what kind of deal you will find,” Alida said. Tari is located at 1525 Wisconsin Ave., NW., and open 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., Tuesday through [gallery ids="118755,118752" nav="thumbs"]

Star Power

This season’s provocative, West Coast-inspired looks give new meaning to “Hollywood on the Potomac.” At the top of the town, the Capella Hotel’s rooftop pool is an unforgettable setting to relax … or be discovered. Venue – Capella Hotel Photographer – Yvonne Taylor Photographers Assistant – Michael Taylor Stylist – Pam Burns Hair – Darrell Thompson Make-up – Flaminia Garioni Model – Hilke Eyler - Wilhelmina Male Model – Casey Dobyns – THE Artist Agency Fashion 1 Coral 2 piece bathing suit by Karla Colletto Necklace, blue stone with gold rim at Dalton Pratt Sunglasses by Celine at Saks Hat by Melissa Vap Fashion 2 Black bathing suit by Karla Colletto Necklace, black/coral/pink at Dalton Pratt Shoes, black patent leather Jimmy Choo Wedges at Saks Fashion 3 Fuchsia bathing suit by Karla Colletto Male model: Yellow linen shirt Zegna at Neiman Marcus; White linen pants by Vilebrequin at Neiman Marcus Fashion 4 Blue 2 piece bathing suit by Karla Colletto Necklace, blue turquoise at Dalton Pratt Sunglasses by Prada at Saks Male model: Blue shirt by Vilebrequin White linen pants by Vilebrequin at Neiman Marcus Sunglasses at Gant [gallery ids="101303,150121,150117,150113" nav="thumbs"]

The Closet Cure for the COVID Blues

Did you know that you can change how you feel by changing what you wear? Or that how you feel can affect both your behavior and how others respond to you?  Did you know that you can change how you feel by changing what you wear? Or that how you feel can affect both your behavior and how others respond to you? 

A Guide to Quarantine Glamour

Days in our comfy college sweatshirt, unwashed hair and no makeup are driving us to the brink — and our partners to the hills.