Cocktail of the Month: Met’s 30-Tap Martini Dispenser

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A 30-tap martini dispenser? It sounds like something fabulous from Willy Wonka’s adult playground. Or like I’ve died and gone to cocktail heaven.

Fortunately, one does not have to visit the next dimension to encounter this extravagant invention. The Met Bar & Grill in Bethesda recently unveiled its Met Martini Bar, which melds flavorful drinks using fresh fruit purees. The innovative on-tap system was designed by restaurant owner Kathy Sidell. In fact, it is one of a kind. Sidell hired Custom Beverage Service in Boston to create her vision.

What makes the system unique is the customization of a CO float system traditionally used for beer, tweaked to store and pour a variety of house-made purees through chilled glass tubes and out the taps. This allows for a quick infusion, creating refreshing drinks that can be enjoyed with or without spirits. The system can pour up to 30 different selections.

Much like draft beer, the purees, kept in kegs that hold 18.9 liters, are pumped via nitrogen gas. Even though they are kept at 36 degrees, the purees are dispensed into a shaker with ice in order to craft a well-balanced cocktail when added to the base liquor.
With all these choices, how are newbies to decide what’s best for them? The bartenders are well versed on all the flavors and ready to guide you.

According to general manager Susan Spiwak: “We ask first if they are in the mood for a sweet, refreshing, bitter, sour or tart drink. The answer to this will automatically take us in a direction. For example, if they said, ‘refreshing,’ we would stay away from the sweeter purees like lychee, coconut or white peach, while leaning towards the citrus flavors or passion fruit. Then we ask what kind of liquor. If they choose bourbon, we have to be aware of the sugars in the spirit and how it will react to the puree. Same with the floral notes of gin.
“This is where some coaching and some control goes back to the bartender. Part of the bartenders’ training consists of tasting each individual puree.” She added, “This is a critical part of their training so they can understand how sweet, sour, tart or bitter each puree is.”

The customers seem to enjoy the control they can exert over their drinks. Spiwak said, “I had a guest who wanted a coconut mojito with a splash of El Corazon (a blend of passion fruit, pomegranate and blood orange). This used three purees: coconut, lime mint and El Corazon. This particular guest loved the creative input he was able to contribute to his experience. He created three more.”

It’s not just the customers that are having fun with inventing new tipples. “One of the cocktails that became very popular after one experimental afternoon was the moco loco,” Spiwak recalls. “This consisted of Old Overholt, caramelized pineapple puree, jalapeño powder and ginger beer.”

The flavors currently offered are: blood orange, lychee, Meyer lemon, blueberry, cherry, caramelized pineapple, coconut, passion fruit, El Corazon, pomegranate, white peach, lime mint, pink guava, apricot, green apple, mango, prickly pear, raspberry, strawberry, papaya, cranberry, hibiscus and tangerine. Most are pretty consistent, but some may be swapped out with the change of the season. Any drink that calls for lemon juice or cranberry juice is made with the Meyer lemon or cranberry puree.

With all the different purees, spirits and other mixers, the possibilities are endless.

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